Guide to Temperature Control Vaping

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What Is Temperature Control Vaping?

Nobody likes a dry hit. It’s unpleasant, tastes foul, and having to change a coil at an inopportune moment can leave us in a bit of a tizz. Temperature Control aims to combat this by monitoring and limiting the temperature of the coil, and not allowing it to exceed a certain temperature, ensuring dry hits and burnt wicks are a thing of the past. Here’s our brief guide on Temperature Control vaping.

How Does Temperature Control Work?

Temperature Control mode (TC) is becoming more of a standard feature, but isn’t available on every device. If you’re looking to purchase a device to use TC mode, it’s worth checking that the device has this function before buying.

Temperature Control works by allowing the user to pre-set a value in either Fahrenheit or Celsius, with the device limiting and cutting off the power if the temperature exceeds this value.

TC mode allows the coil to remain at a fixed and consistent rate, whether you’re chain vaping volcanic-sized clouds, or doing the more easy going mouth-to-lung method.

If putting in a brand new coil, it must be installed at room temperature, otherwise it will not work, and the mod’s calculations will be incorrect. Also if you’re building your own Temperature Control coils, we do not recommend pulsing them. If you do accidentally pulse them, allow the coils to return to room temperature before using to vape on.

To set up TC for the first time you will need to first ensure sure that your device is TC compatible. Variable Wattage and Variable Voltage (VW/VV) devices will simply not work with Temperature Control coils, and you’ll need to ensure that both your device and coil are TC capable with Variable Temperature (VT).

After this you’ll need to consider the wire type you’re using in your TC coil, usually Nickel (Ni) or Titanium (Ti), or Stainless Steel (SS), and set your mod to the correct type of TC mode, which will be wither Ni, Ti, or SS, depending on the coil.

Once installed, you’re then free to adjust the wattage to your preference, but it’s recommended to use the manufacturer’s recommended wattage for the coil. The idea is that the device will power to your desired wattage, but not over the limits of the TC setting.

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Properties Of Nickel, Titanium, & Stainless Steel Wires

The two most common wire types for Temperature Control are Nickel (Ni) and Titanium (Ti). There are other wire types available, including Stainless Steel (SS) but Ni and Ti are the most prevalent on the current market.

Nickel is used in many pre-made coils such as Ni200’s, and are most often rated at 0.15Ω. It has a very high temperature co-efficient, meaning that its resistance doesn’t fluctuate very much when heated, and remains quite stable at high temperatures.

Titanium is relatively new for the vaping market, but is becoming used more and more for TC as it’s much stronger in its construction than Nickel, and has almost double the resistance. This means that less wraps can be used in a wind to achieve the same resistance as with Nickel.

Constructed from a mix of Carbon, Nickel, and Chromium, Stainless Steel (SS) wire has some decent functional properties that allow it to be used with both Variable Wattage as well as Variable Temperature modes. The most common SS wire is 316L; a medical grade metal that’s grown steadily in popularity among vapers for use in TC devices.

While most of the more recent mods on the market have a dedicated setting for SS, some of the older mods don’t have this function, so it’s a good idea to double check before making a purchase.

Compared to Titanium and Nickel, Stainless Steel wire is cheaper, stronger, and is deemed to be a bit easier to work with in terms of building, as it lacks the springy quality that other wire types possess.

Benefits & Drawbacks Of TC Vaping

A major benefit of vaping in Temperature Control modes is dry hits are no longer an issue, due to the more accurate regulation of the TC coils. This also means the atomisers themselves tend to last a bit longer as well.

If the wick becomes dry, the temperature will increase, and the TC mode will immediately protect the coil by cutting off the power. Rewicking Nickel can be a little tricky, as it’s more fragile that Kanthal, and heavy-handedness can cause it to lose its structural integrity, so it’s recommended to be extra careful if rebuilding coils made of Nickel.

Temperature Control can take a little bit of time to get used to, but is relatively easy to pick up and understand after spending a little time on it. We recommend learning which temperature and wattage is the best for maximum output.

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If you’d like to talk to us about Temperature Control modes, or anything else featured on our website, please do get in contact with our team.